UX DESIGN LIFE-CYCLE, PART 6: PROTOTYPE MAIN/SECONDARY SCENARIOS

Know how spaghetti always seems to taste better on the second day? The reason is simple: the pasta absorbs a lot of the moisture and some of the sauce. When you re-heat it, it retains the flavor without being as "wet" as the day before. Prototyping is one of the most powerful steps in the design process. It melds together your research, flow, and visuals, giving a soul to your idea. We will discuss two methods we use for prototyping, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of each approach.

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UX DESIGN LIFE-CYCLE, A MINI-SERIES

Clients ask: “...tell us about your process or design principles.” I am going to do something far more valuable: I am going to write about what has worked and what has not worked. In the weeks ahead, I will post a series of bite-sized articles that encapsulate the life-cycle of product design and user experience (UX), across a variety of industries, with clients both large and small, with consumer and commercial projects.

Trust me: you will have fun reading these and you will learn something new.

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UX HIRE OR CONTRACT DESIGN TEAM?

Creating a great user experience takes a combination of leadership, customer insight, workflow analysis, visual design, and precise front-end coding, followed-up with careful user observation. It takes an experienced team that tips the scales in favor of skill-sets over dedicated employment.

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Go out into the field and rap to these people

Tools like mixpanel or SurveyMonkey provide insight into what end-users are doing within your app or service. These tools may even help gauge overall customer satisfaction, but that’s the not the critical part of the story.  A well-executed user study will drive impactful user experience design (UXD), leading to beautiful things that engage your customers and create competitive advantage.

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Role of the Team Lead vs Manager

An Ounce of Prevention is Worth a Pound of Cure. To avoid team dysfunction, I have learned to do two things:

1. Push decision responsibility far down into an organization by creating many small teams, even as small as 2-persons, with a dedicated team leader;

2. Carefully separate the roles of Team Lead from Manager and communicate expectations for each role.

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